Google Launches project ‘Relate’ App for people with speech impairment

Advertisement
Google Launches project ‘Relate’ App for people with speech impairment

Technology is being redefined and reimagined right now. We’ve evolved from a time when touch displays were all the rage to a time when our interactions with the digital devices that surround us are including more senses. On the other hand, technology can only improve our lives if it is made available to all of us. Google has taken the lead and created Project Relate, an Android app aimed at making technology more accessible to everyone.

Related: Popular Smartphone Manufacturer Oppo Collaborates with Daraz for their Annual 11.11 Sale

About Project ‘Relate’

The program is called Project Relate, and it’s supposed to help users understand each other by providing voice transcription and synthesis. This app is intended specifically for people who have trouble speaking.

The software is based on Project Euphonia, which was announced in 2019. Google later made public a portion of its Project Euphonia findings.

Dimitri Kanevsky, a Google research scientist with speech impairment, led the endeavor and provided direct input into the AI-based solution. Aubrie Lee, who has muscular dystrophy and works on the company’s marketing team (and named the app), is now one of the project’s major partners and app users.

Advertisement

Related: Instagram Will Soon Remind You Take a Break

Why the app is developed?

People with thick accents aren’t portrayed correctly in Google Assistant, which means they’re not understood. Those who have speech impairments are also excluded, making it impossible for them to utilize voice-activated gadgets on a daily basis. Many companies working on this technology are trying to improve it so that they can understand languages with significant accents.

According to the company, the app is still being examined, and applicants for beta testing positions will be contacted “in the coming months.” This is, nevertheless, an important first step in improving speech recognition for persons who communicate in unusual ways.

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.